Hermosa Montessori

Be sure to click “…” to expand the entire email
When Dr. Montessori created her educational philosophy and materials, the world had not yet been infused with the technology and devices that are now common in the 21st century. As a public charter school, Hermosa integrates Arizona Academic Standards within the context of Montessori philosophy. The Arizona Academic Technology Standards are designed to … “illustrate what students should know and be able to do in a digital world.” The Technology Standards include the following Sample Student Performance guidelines, “ Students use automated learning systems to demonstrate learning and receive active feedback (e.g., online quizzes, interactive content learning platforms). •Students create, review, and share work using digital tools. •Students, with guidance, create artifacts using digital tools to demonstrate their learning, such as posters, presentations, video, or audio recordings. 
Students curate resources (e.g., locate, collect, select) from multiple sources for an intended purpose. • Students use digital tools to organize online resources, information, and media into useful collections or artifacts (e.g., graphic organizers, timelines, infographics). •Students select and organize digital resources, then use a variety of digital tools (e.g., resource management, annotation and notetaking, citation-creation) to showcase learning through an assemblage of content and/or artifacts (e.g., portfolio, website, multimedia). “
While we work to integrate technology wisely into our curriculum, we are aware of the possibility of misuse and even addiction. The following article from Dr. Charles Fay provides excellent examples of how to tame the technology monster.
“Although the basics of parenting remain the same, issues involving technology often baffle many parents and cause them to wonder what limits are appropriate, how to hold their children accountable for misuse of technology, and how to help kids learn the decision-making skills required to make healthy technology choices when they leave home.
Do you ever feel like your child’s cell phone, game console, or computer is like a monster that has taken over your home? Here are some signs that technology use might be a problem for your kids:
Do your kids become defiant and refuse to take a break from their phone or computer?
Even if they are willing to take a break, do they become exceptionally irritable, depressed, or bored during that time?
Do they lie to you about their technology use and sneak time during their break?
Any of these classic withdrawal symptoms are possible signs that your loved one has a problem that can lead to serious consequences if left untreated.
Technology can be a wonderful tool for communication, learning, and healthy enjoyment. However it can also become a dark and destructive influence in the absence of necessary parental supervision and limits. Below are a few examples of enforceable limits that we, as parents, can provide:
  • You may have your computer in the living room, not in your room.
  • You may be on the internet if I’m allowed to review your internet history.
  • You may be on social media if I can have access to your pages.
  • Feel free to have a cell phone if you can pay for the service.
  • You may keep your cell phone if you are not using it during meals, in class, or while driving.
  • I allow kids to use technology in my home if I feel that they are being respectful and responsible.
  • I immediately donate to charity any devices used to view or send pornography.
Although we can’t control what our kids do when they are away from home, we can set good, solid limits while they’re under our roofs. If they complain, “You don’t trust me!” you can reply, “I don’t even trust myself. Lots of good people get in trouble with technology. That’s why I always make sure that your mom/dad knows what I’m doing on my computer, too.”
-Charles Fay Ph.D.
COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS
Stay tuned for all carnival information, including:
-Purchasing Entry Wristband
-More Raffle Basket Donation Opportunities
-Volunteer Sign Up
-Volunteer Schedule (for those volunteering on the event day)
-Commemorative Carnival T-Shirt Print Orders (designed by Hermosa student)
-All Carnival Attractions:
-Rides
-Games
-Food Trucks
-Entertainment
-and MORE!
In Language Arts, students started reading their first novels, and learned how to complete a reading response. Small groups meet in “book club” groups to discuss their novels. 
In Natural World (Science), students pondered these quotes:
“Gravity cannot be held responsible for people falling in love.” 
– Albert Einstein 
“It also can’t be blamed for people falling…
when they’re just clumsy.”
– Sammi
and the following guiding question,
How do machines change the way work is done?”
Students learned the scientific definition of work defined as a force applied over a distance (work=force x distance). They also learned that machines affect work done on an object by either changing the force that is applied or the distance the object moves and that simple machines humans created were devised to make work easier. Students learned the historical perspective on machines that helped create the pyramids, Stonehenge, and other ancient wonders. The six simple machines are the inclined plane, the wedge, the screw, the lever, the wheel and axle, and the pulley. Students put their learning on display in their lab activities in which they participated in the simple machines experiments. They also built various simple machines to learn about:
 
  • Effort Force
  • Efficiency
  • Resistant Force
  • Mechanical Advantage
  • Resistance Force
Students worked on their personal projects to either design and build their own functioning simple machine, write a children’s book about the simple machines around us with color illustrations that could be shared with the lower elementary classrooms, research the simple machines in the human body and build a model showing at least three of these.
ELEMENTARY II COMMUNITY
Fourth Great Lesson
Students participated in the Montessori 
“ Fourth Great Lesson” often referred to as Communication in Signs. This lesson is the historical story telling of how humans developed written expression. This lesson draws on the incredible ability that humans have of expressing their thoughts in writing. Included in the story are pictographs, symbols, hieroglyphs, early alphabets, and the invention of the printing press.
This lesson leads then leads to the study of:
  • Reading: literature, poetry, non-fiction, myths and folk tales, authors, reading comprehension, reading analysis, literary terms.
  • Writing: elements of style, function, voice, composition, letter writing, research, study skills.
  • Language: origins of spoken language, foreign languages, history of languages, speech, drama
  • Structure: alphabets, bookmaking, grammar, punctuation, sentence analysis, word study, figures of speech.
ELEMENTARY I COMMUNITY
Third year students integrate 21st century
technology into their weekly lessons.
SEL lessons continued with the lesson on “self talk.” Self-talk is a skill for learning that helps students stay focused, and on task. This skill also helps students manage their emotions so they can make better decisions in stressful situations. The lesson is taught with stories and games such as the “Let’s Play Who’s Talking” game designed to help students practice focusing attention and listening. 
Students continue to use the illustrative Montessori materials to learn and practice abstract concepts.
Elementary Montessori Materials-Concrete to Abstract
Montessori materials illustrate concepts and lead to an understanding of abstract concepts. Our classrooms are filled with many such materials. For example, all students enjoy working with the grammar symbols, which helps students understand the building blocks of our language. We analyze and build sentences with these colorful materials.
PRIMARY COMMUNITY
Elder Way primary students learned about the Mars Rovers, how they were constructed, traveled to Mars, and their purpose. Many students made their own rovers out of cardboard, tape and pipe cleaners. We spent some time looking at photos from Perseverance and listening to audio from Mars as well.
Your Extracurricular
Dollars at Work
The “Three Sisters’ ‘ garden continues to grow and thrive. The glass-gem corn has been harvested, and the tepary beans are just beginning to produce! Our very first squash blossoms are in bloom.
“How to Make a Sincere Apology”
A Lesson in Social Emotional Learning
HERMOSA STUDENT
ATHLETE PROGRAM
FOOTBALL
BASKETBALL
CHEERLEADING
HERMOSA MONTESSORI PUBLIC CHARTER SCHOOL (K-8)
HERMOSA MONTESSORI PRESCHOOL
520.749.5518
Questions about Headlines?
Contact HRT@hermosaschool.org
www.hermosaschool.org


  SHARE:
Join Our Email List

Be sure to click “…” to expand the entire email
When Dr. Montessori created her educational philosophy and materials, the world had not yet been infused with the technology and devices that are now common in the 21st century. As a public charter school, Hermosa integrates Arizona Academic Standards within the context of Montessori philosophy. The Arizona Academic Technology Standards are designed to … “illustrate what students should know and be able to do in a digital world.” The Technology Standards include the following Sample Student Performance guidelines, “ Students use automated learning systems to demonstrate learning and receive active feedback (e.g., online quizzes, interactive content learning platforms). •Students create, review, and share work using digital tools. •Students, with guidance, create artifacts using digital tools to demonstrate their learning, such as posters, presentations, video, or audio recordings. 
Students curate resources (e.g., locate, collect, select) from multiple sources for an intended purpose. • Students use digital tools to organize online resources, information, and media into useful collections or artifacts (e.g., graphic organizers, timelines, infographics). •Students select and organize digital resources, then use a variety of digital tools (e.g., resource management, annotation and notetaking, citation-creation) to showcase learning through an assemblage of content and/or artifacts (e.g., portfolio, website, multimedia). “
While we work to integrate technology wisely into our curriculum, we are aware of the possibility of misuse and even addiction. The following article from Dr. Charles Fay provides excellent examples of how to tame the technology monster.
“Although the basics of parenting remain the same, issues involving technology often baffle many parents and cause them to wonder what limits are appropriate, how to hold their children accountable for misuse of technology, and how to help kids learn the decision-making skills required to make healthy technology choices when they leave home.
Do you ever feel like your child’s cell phone, game console, or computer is like a monster that has taken over your home? Here are some signs that technology use might be a problem for your kids:
Do your kids become defiant and refuse to take a break from their phone or computer?
Even if they are willing to take a break, do they become exceptionally irritable, depressed, or bored during that time?
Do they lie to you about their technology use and sneak time during their break?
Any of these classic withdrawal symptoms are possible signs that your loved one has a problem that can lead to serious consequences if left untreated.
Technology can be a wonderful tool for communication, learning, and healthy enjoyment. However it can also become a dark and destructive influence in the absence of necessary parental supervision and limits. Below are a few examples of enforceable limits that we, as parents, can provide:
  • You may have your computer in the living room, not in your room.
  • You may be on the internet if I’m allowed to review your internet history.
  • You may be on social media if I can have access to your pages.
  • Feel free to have a cell phone if you can pay for the service.
  • You may keep your cell phone if you are not using it during meals, in class, or while driving.
  • I allow kids to use technology in my home if I feel that they are being respectful and responsible.
  • I immediately donate to charity any devices used to view or send pornography.
Although we can’t control what our kids do when they are away from home, we can set good, solid limits while they’re under our roofs. If they complain, “You don’t trust me!” you can reply, “I don’t even trust myself. Lots of good people get in trouble with technology. That’s why I always make sure that your mom/dad knows what I’m doing on my computer, too.”
-Charles Fay Ph.D.
COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS
Stay tuned for all carnival information, including:
-Purchasing Entry Wristband
-More Raffle Basket Donation Opportunities
-Volunteer Sign Up
-Volunteer Schedule (for those volunteering on the event day)
-Commemorative Carnival T-Shirt Print Orders (designed by Hermosa student)
-All Carnival Attractions:
-Rides
-Games
-Food Trucks
-Entertainment
-and MORE!
In Language Arts, students started reading their first novels, and learned how to complete a reading response. Small groups meet in “book club” groups to discuss their novels. 
In Natural World (Science), students pondered these quotes:
“Gravity cannot be held responsible for people falling in love.” 
– Albert Einstein 
“It also can’t be blamed for people falling…
when they’re just clumsy.”
– Sammi
and the following guiding question,
How do machines change the way work is done?”
Students learned the scientific definition of work defined as a force applied over a distance (work=force x distance). They also learned that machines affect work done on an object by either changing the force that is applied or the distance the object moves and that simple machines humans created were devised to make work easier. Students learned the historical perspective on machines that helped create the pyramids, Stonehenge, and other ancient wonders. The six simple machines are the inclined plane, the wedge, the screw, the lever, the wheel and axle, and the pulley. Students put their learning on display in their lab activities in which they participated in the simple machines experiments. They also built various simple machines to learn about:
 
  • Effort Force
  • Efficiency
  • Resistant Force
  • Mechanical Advantage
  • Resistance Force
Students worked on their personal projects to either design and build their own functioning simple machine, write a children’s book about the simple machines around us with color illustrations that could be shared with the lower elementary classrooms, research the simple machines in the human body and build a model showing at least three of these.
ELEMENTARY II COMMUNITY
Fourth Great Lesson
Students participated in the Montessori 
“ Fourth Great Lesson” often referred to as Communication in Signs. This lesson is the historical story telling of how humans developed written expression. This lesson draws on the incredible ability that humans have of expressing their thoughts in writing. Included in the story are pictographs, symbols, hieroglyphs, early alphabets, and the invention of the printing press.
This lesson leads then leads to the study of:
  • Reading: literature, poetry, non-fiction, myths and folk tales, authors, reading comprehension, reading analysis, literary terms.
  • Writing: elements of style, function, voice, composition, letter writing, research, study skills.
  • Language: origins of spoken language, foreign languages, history of languages, speech, drama
  • Structure: alphabets, bookmaking, grammar, punctuation, sentence analysis, word study, figures of speech.
ELEMENTARY I COMMUNITY
Third year students integrate 21st century
technology into their weekly lessons.
SEL lessons continued with the lesson on “self talk.” Self-talk is a skill for learning that helps students stay focused, and on task. This skill also helps students manage their emotions so they can make better decisions in stressful situations. The lesson is taught with stories and games such as the “Let’s Play Who’s Talking” game designed to help students practice focusing attention and listening. 
Students continue to use the illustrative Montessori materials to learn and practice abstract concepts.
Elementary Montessori Materials-Concrete to Abstract
Montessori materials illustrate concepts and lead to an understanding of abstract concepts. Our classrooms are filled with many such materials. For example, all students enjoy working with the grammar symbols, which helps students understand the building blocks of our language. We analyze and build sentences with these colorful materials.
PRIMARY COMMUNITY
Elder Way primary students learned about the Mars Rovers, how they were constructed, traveled to Mars, and their purpose. Many students made their own rovers out of cardboard, tape and pipe cleaners. We spent some time looking at photos from Perseverance and listening to audio from Mars as well.
Your Extracurricular
Dollars at Work
The “Three Sisters’ ‘ garden continues to grow and thrive. The glass-gem corn has been harvested, and the tepary beans are just beginning to produce! Our very first squash blossoms are in bloom.
“How to Make a Sincere Apology”
A Lesson in Social Emotional Learning
HERMOSA STUDENT
ATHLETE PROGRAM
FOOTBALL
BASKETBALL
CHEERLEADING
HERMOSA MONTESSORI PUBLIC CHARTER SCHOOL (K-8)
HERMOSA MONTESSORI PRESCHOOL
520.749.5518
Questions about Headlines?
Contact HRT@hermosaschool.org
www.hermosaschool.org

  SHARE:
Join Our Email List

Be sure to click “…” to expand the entire email
When Dr. Montessori created her educational philosophy and materials, the world had not yet been infused with the technology and devices that are now common in the 21st century. As a public charter school, Hermosa integrates Arizona Academic Standards within the context of Montessori philosophy. The Arizona Academic Technology Standards are designed to … “illustrate what students should know and be able to do in a digital world.” The Technology Standards include the following Sample Student Performance guidelines, “ Students use automated learning systems to demonstrate learning and receive active feedback (e.g., online quizzes, interactive content learning platforms). •Students create, review, and share work using digital tools. •Students, with guidance, create artifacts using digital tools to demonstrate their learning, such as posters, presentations, video, or audio recordings. 
Students curate resources (e.g., locate, collect, select) from multiple sources for an intended purpose. • Students use digital tools to organize online resources, information, and media into useful collections or artifacts (e.g., graphic organizers, timelines, infographics). •Students select and organize digital resources, then use a variety of digital tools (e.g., resource management, annotation and notetaking, citation-creation) to showcase learning through an assemblage of content and/or artifacts (e.g., portfolio, website, multimedia). “
While we work to integrate technology wisely into our curriculum, we are aware of the possibility of misuse and even addiction. The following article from Dr. Charles Fay provides excellent examples of how to tame the technology monster.
“Although the basics of parenting remain the same, issues involving technology often baffle many parents and cause them to wonder what limits are appropriate, how to hold their children accountable for misuse of technology, and how to help kids learn the decision-making skills required to make healthy technology choices when they leave home.
Do you ever feel like your child’s cell phone, game console, or computer is like a monster that has taken over your home? Here are some signs that technology use might be a problem for your kids:
Do your kids become defiant and refuse to take a break from their phone or computer?
Even if they are willing to take a break, do they become exceptionally irritable, depressed, or bored during that time?
Do they lie to you about their technology use and sneak time during their break?
Any of these classic withdrawal symptoms are possible signs that your loved one has a problem that can lead to serious consequences if left untreated.
Technology can be a wonderful tool for communication, learning, and healthy enjoyment. However it can also become a dark and destructive influence in the absence of necessary parental supervision and limits. Below are a few examples of enforceable limits that we, as parents, can provide:
  • You may have your computer in the living room, not in your room.
  • You may be on the internet if I’m allowed to review your internet history.
  • You may be on social media if I can have access to your pages.
  • Feel free to have a cell phone if you can pay for the service.
  • You may keep your cell phone if you are not using it during meals, in class, or while driving.
  • I allow kids to use technology in my home if I feel that they are being respectful and responsible.
  • I immediately donate to charity any devices used to view or send pornography.
Although we can’t control what our kids do when they are away from home, we can set good, solid limits while they’re under our roofs. If they complain, “You don’t trust me!” you can reply, “I don’t even trust myself. Lots of good people get in trouble with technology. That’s why I always make sure that your mom/dad knows what I’m doing on my computer, too.”
-Charles Fay Ph.D.
COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS
Stay tuned for all carnival information, including:
-Purchasing Entry Wristband
-More Raffle Basket Donation Opportunities
-Volunteer Sign Up
-Volunteer Schedule (for those volunteering on the event day)
-Commemorative Carnival T-Shirt Print Orders (designed by Hermosa student)
-All Carnival Attractions:
-Rides
-Games
-Food Trucks
-Entertainment
-and MORE!
In Language Arts, students started reading their first novels, and learned how to complete a reading response. Small groups meet in “book club” groups to discuss their novels. 
In Natural World (Science), students pondered these quotes:
“Gravity cannot be held responsible for people falling in love.” 
– Albert Einstein 
“It also can’t be blamed for people falling…
when they’re just clumsy.”
– Sammi
and the following guiding question,
How do machines change the way work is done?”
Students learned the scientific definition of work defined as a force applied over a distance (work=force x distance). They also learned that machines affect work done on an object by either changing the force that is applied or the distance the object moves and that simple machines humans created were devised to make work easier. Students learned the historical perspective on machines that helped create the pyramids, Stonehenge, and other ancient wonders. The six simple machines are the inclined plane, the wedge, the screw, the lever, the wheel and axle, and the pulley. Students put their learning on display in their lab activities in which they participated in the simple machines experiments. They also built various simple machines to learn about:
 
  • Effort Force
  • Efficiency
  • Resistant Force
  • Mechanical Advantage
  • Resistance Force
Students worked on their personal projects to either design and build their own functioning simple machine, write a children’s book about the simple machines around us with color illustrations that could be shared with the lower elementary classrooms, research the simple machines in the human body and build a model showing at least three of these.
ELEMENTARY II COMMUNITY
Fourth Great Lesson
Students participated in the Montessori 
“ Fourth Great Lesson” often referred to as Communication in Signs. This lesson is the historical story telling of how humans developed written expression. This lesson draws on the incredible ability that humans have of expressing their thoughts in writing. Included in the story are pictographs, symbols, hieroglyphs, early alphabets, and the invention of the printing press.
This lesson leads then leads to the study of:
  • Reading: literature, poetry, non-fiction, myths and folk tales, authors, reading comprehension, reading analysis, literary terms.
  • Writing: elements of style, function, voice, composition, letter writing, research, study skills.
  • Language: origins of spoken language, foreign languages, history of languages, speech, drama
  • Structure: alphabets, bookmaking, grammar, punctuation, sentence analysis, word study, figures of speech.
ELEMENTARY I COMMUNITY
Third year students integrate 21st century
technology into their weekly lessons.
SEL lessons continued with the lesson on “self talk.” Self-talk is a skill for learning that helps students stay focused, and on task. This skill also helps students manage their emotions so they can make better decisions in stressful situations. The lesson is taught with stories and games such as the “Let’s Play Who’s Talking” game designed to help students practice focusing attention and listening. 
Students continue to use the illustrative Montessori materials to learn and practice abstract concepts.
Elementary Montessori Materials-Concrete to Abstract
Montessori materials illustrate concepts and lead to an understanding of abstract concepts. Our classrooms are filled with many such materials. For example, all students enjoy working with the grammar symbols, which helps students understand the building blocks of our language. We analyze and build sentences with these colorful materials.
PRIMARY COMMUNITY
Elder Way primary students learned about the Mars Rovers, how they were constructed, traveled to Mars, and their purpose. Many students made their own rovers out of cardboard, tape and pipe cleaners. We spent some time looking at photos from Perseverance and listening to audio from Mars as well.
Your Extracurricular
Dollars at Work
The “Three Sisters’ ‘ garden continues to grow and thrive. The glass-gem corn has been harvested, and the tepary beans are just beginning to produce! Our very first squash blossoms are in bloom.
“How to Make a Sincere Apology”
A Lesson in Social Emotional Learning
HERMOSA STUDENT
ATHLETE PROGRAM
FOOTBALL
BASKETBALL
CHEERLEADING
HERMOSA MONTESSORI PUBLIC CHARTER SCHOOL (K-8)
HERMOSA MONTESSORI PRESCHOOL
520.749.5518
Questions about Headlines?
Contact HRT@hermosaschool.org
www.hermosaschool.org

Be sure to click “…” to expand the entire email
When Dr. Montessori created her educational philosophy and materials, the world had not yet been infused with the technology and devices that are now common in the 21st century. As a public charter school, Hermosa integrates Arizona Academic Standards within the context of Montessori philosophy. The Arizona Academic Technology Standards are designed to … “illustrate what students should know and be able to do in a digital world.” The Technology Standards include the following Sample Student Performance guidelines, “ Students use automated learning systems to demonstrate learning and receive active feedback (e.g., online quizzes, interactive content learning platforms). •Students create, review, and share work using digital tools. •Students, with guidance, create artifacts using digital tools to demonstrate their learning, such as posters, presentations, video, or audio recordings. 
Students curate resources (e.g., locate, collect, select) from multiple sources for an intended purpose. • Students use digital tools to organize online resources, information, and media into useful collections or artifacts (e.g., graphic organizers, timelines, infographics). •Students select and organize digital resources, then use a variety of digital tools (e.g., resource management, annotation and notetaking, citation-creation) to showcase learning through an assemblage of content and/or artifacts (e.g., portfolio, website, multimedia). “
While we work to integrate technology wisely into our curriculum, we are aware of the possibility of misuse and even addiction. The following article from Dr. Charles Fay provides excellent examples of how to tame the technology monster.
“Although the basics of parenting remain the same, issues involving technology often baffle many parents and cause them to wonder what limits are appropriate, how to hold their children accountable for misuse of technology, and how to help kids learn the decision-making skills required to make healthy technology choices when they leave home.
Do you ever feel like your child’s cell phone, game console, or computer is like a monster that has taken over your home? Here are some signs that technology use might be a problem for your kids:
Do your kids become defiant and refuse to take a break from their phone or computer?
Even if they are willing to take a break, do they become exceptionally irritable, depressed, or bored during that time?
Do they lie to you about their technology use and sneak time during their break?
Any of these classic withdrawal symptoms are possible signs that your loved one has a problem that can lead to serious consequences if left untreated.
Technology can be a wonderful tool for communication, learning, and healthy enjoyment. However it can also become a dark and destructive influence in the absence of necessary parental supervision and limits. Below are a few examples of enforceable limits that we, as parents, can provide:
  • You may have your computer in the living room, not in your room.
  • You may be on the internet if I’m allowed to review your internet history.
  • You may be on social media if I can have access to your pages.
  • Feel free to have a cell phone if you can pay for the service.
  • You may keep your cell phone if you are not using it during meals, in class, or while driving.
  • I allow kids to use technology in my home if I feel that they are being respectful and responsible.
  • I immediately donate to charity any devices used to view or send pornography.
Although we can’t control what our kids do when they are away from home, we can set good, solid limits while they’re under our roofs. If they complain, “You don’t trust me!” you can reply, “I don’t even trust myself. Lots of good people get in trouble with technology. That’s why I always make sure that your mom/dad knows what I’m doing on my computer, too.”
-Charles Fay Ph.D.
COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS
Stay tuned for all carnival information, including:
-Purchasing Entry Wristband
-More Raffle Basket Donation Opportunities
-Volunteer Sign Up
-Volunteer Schedule (for those volunteering on the event day)
-Commemorative Carnival T-Shirt Print Orders (designed by Hermosa student)
-All Carnival Attractions:
-Rides
-Games
-Food Trucks
-Entertainment
-and MORE!
In Language Arts, students started reading their first novels, and learned how to complete a reading response. Small groups meet in “book club” groups to discuss their novels. 
In Natural World (Science), students pondered these quotes:
“Gravity cannot be held responsible for people falling in love.” 
– Albert Einstein 
“It also can’t be blamed for people falling…
when they’re just clumsy.”
– Sammi
and the following guiding question,
How do machines change the way work is done?”
Students learned the scientific definition of work defined as a force applied over a distance (work=force x distance). They also learned that machines affect work done on an object by either changing the force that is applied or the distance the object moves and that simple machines humans created were devised to make work easier. Students learned the historical perspective on machines that helped create the pyramids, Stonehenge, and other ancient wonders. The six simple machines are the inclined plane, the wedge, the screw, the lever, the wheel and axle, and the pulley. Students put their learning on display in their lab activities in which they participated in the simple machines experiments. They also built various simple machines to learn about:
 
  • Effort Force
  • Efficiency
  • Resistant Force
  • Mechanical Advantage
  • Resistance Force
Students worked on their personal projects to either design and build their own functioning simple machine, write a children’s book about the simple machines around us with color illustrations that could be shared with the lower elementary classrooms, research the simple machines in the human body and build a model showing at least three of these.
ELEMENTARY II COMMUNITY
Fourth Great Lesson
Students participated in the Montessori 
“ Fourth Great Lesson” often referred to as Communication in Signs. This lesson is the historical story telling of how humans developed written expression. This lesson draws on the incredible ability that humans have of expressing their thoughts in writing. Included in the story are pictographs, symbols, hieroglyphs, early alphabets, and the invention of the printing press.
This lesson leads then leads to the study of:
  • Reading: literature, poetry, non-fiction, myths and folk tales, authors, reading comprehension, reading analysis, literary terms.
  • Writing: elements of style, function, voice, composition, letter writing, research, study skills.
  • Language: origins of spoken language, foreign languages, history of languages, speech, drama
  • Structure: alphabets, bookmaking, grammar, punctuation, sentence analysis, word study, figures of speech.
ELEMENTARY I COMMUNITY
Third year students integrate 21st century
technology into their weekly lessons.
SEL lessons continued with the lesson on “self talk.” Self-talk is a skill for learning that helps students stay focused, and on task. This skill also helps students manage their emotions so they can make better decisions in stressful situations. The lesson is taught with stories and games such as the “Let’s Play Who’s Talking” game designed to help students practice focusing attention and listening. 
Students continue to use the illustrative Montessori materials to learn and practice abstract concepts.
Elementary Montessori Materials-Concrete to Abstract
Montessori materials illustrate concepts and lead to an understanding of abstract concepts. Our classrooms are filled with many such materials. For example, all students enjoy working with the grammar symbols, which helps students understand the building blocks of our language. We analyze and build sentences with these colorful materials.
PRIMARY COMMUNITY
Elder Way primary students learned about the Mars Rovers, how they were constructed, traveled to Mars, and their purpose. Many students made their own rovers out of cardboard, tape and pipe cleaners. We spent some time looking at photos from Perseverance and listening to audio from Mars as well.
Your Extracurricular
Dollars at Work
The “Three Sisters’ ‘ garden continues to grow and thrive. The glass-gem corn has been harvested, and the tepary beans are just beginning to produce! Our very first squash blossoms are in bloom.
“How to Make a Sincere Apology”
A Lesson in Social Emotional Learning
HERMOSA STUDENT
ATHLETE PROGRAM
FOOTBALL
BASKETBALL
CHEERLEADING
HERMOSA MONTESSORI PUBLIC CHARTER SCHOOL (K-8)
HERMOSA MONTESSORI PRESCHOOL
520.749.5518
Questions about Headlines?
Contact HRT@hermosaschool.org
www.hermosaschool.org

Be sure to click “…” to expand the entire email
When Dr. Montessori created her educational philosophy and materials, the world had not yet been infused with the technology and devices that are now common in the 21st century. As a public charter school, Hermosa integrates Arizona Academic Standards within the context of Montessori philosophy. The Arizona Academic Technology Standards are designed to … “illustrate what students should know and be able to do in a digital world.” The Technology Standards include the following Sample Student Performance guidelines, “ Students use automated learning systems to demonstrate learning and receive active feedback (e.g., online quizzes, interactive content learning platforms). •Students create, review, and share work using digital tools. •Students, with guidance, create artifacts using digital tools to demonstrate their learning, such as posters, presentations, video, or audio recordings. 
Students curate resources (e.g., locate, collect, select) from multiple sources for an intended purpose. • Students use digital tools to organize online resources, information, and media into useful collections or artifacts (e.g., graphic organizers, timelines, infographics). •Students select and organize digital resources, then use a variety of digital tools (e.g., resource management, annotation and notetaking, citation-creation) to showcase learning through an assemblage of content and/or artifacts (e.g., portfolio, website, multimedia). “
While we work to integrate technology wisely into our curriculum, we are aware of the possibility of misuse and even addiction. The following article from Dr. Charles Fay provides excellent examples of how to tame the technology monster.
“Although the basics of parenting remain the same, issues involving technology often baffle many parents and cause them to wonder what limits are appropriate, how to hold their children accountable for misuse of technology, and how to help kids learn the decision-making skills required to make healthy technology choices when they leave home.
Do you ever feel like your child’s cell phone, game console, or computer is like a monster that has taken over your home? Here are some signs that technology use might be a problem for your kids:
Do your kids become defiant and refuse to take a break from their phone or computer?
Even if they are willing to take a break, do they become exceptionally irritable, depressed, or bored during that time?
Do they lie to you about their technology use and sneak time during their break?
Any of these classic withdrawal symptoms are possible signs that your loved one has a problem that can lead to serious consequences if left untreated.
Technology can be a wonderful tool for communication, learning, and healthy enjoyment. However it can also become a dark and destructive influence in the absence of necessary parental supervision and limits. Below are a few examples of enforceable limits that we, as parents, can provide:
  • You may have your computer in the living room, not in your room.
  • You may be on the internet if I’m allowed to review your internet history.
  • You may be on social media if I can have access to your pages.
  • Feel free to have a cell phone if you can pay for the service.
  • You may keep your cell phone if you are not using it during meals, in class, or while driving.
  • I allow kids to use technology in my home if I feel that they are being respectful and responsible.
  • I immediately donate to charity any devices used to view or send pornography.
Although we can’t control what our kids do when they are away from home, we can set good, solid limits while they’re under our roofs. If they complain, “You don’t trust me!” you can reply, “I don’t even trust myself. Lots of good people get in trouble with technology. That’s why I always make sure that your mom/dad knows what I’m doing on my computer, too.”
-Charles Fay Ph.D.
COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS
Stay tuned for all carnival information, including:
-Purchasing Entry Wristband
-More Raffle Basket Donation Opportunities
-Volunteer Sign Up
-Volunteer Schedule (for those volunteering on the event day)
-Commemorative Carnival T-Shirt Print Orders (designed by Hermosa student)
-All Carnival Attractions:
-Rides
-Games
-Food Trucks
-Entertainment
-and MORE!
In Language Arts, students started reading their first novels, and learned how to complete a reading response. Small groups meet in “book club” groups to discuss their novels. 
In Natural World (Science), students pondered these quotes:
“Gravity cannot be held responsible for people falling in love.” 
– Albert Einstein 
“It also can’t be blamed for people falling…
when they’re just clumsy.”
– Sammi
and the following guiding question,
How do machines change the way work is done?”
Students learned the scientific definition of work defined as a force applied over a distance (work=force x distance). They also learned that machines affect work done on an object by either changing the force that is applied or the distance the object moves and that simple machines humans created were devised to make work easier. Students learned the historical perspective on machines that helped create the pyramids, Stonehenge, and other ancient wonders. The six simple machines are the inclined plane, the wedge, the screw, the lever, the wheel and axle, and the pulley. Students put their learning on display in their lab activities in which they participated in the simple machines experiments. They also built various simple machines to learn about:
 
  • Effort Force
  • Efficiency
  • Resistant Force
  • Mechanical Advantage
  • Resistance Force
Students worked on their personal projects to either design and build their own functioning simple machine, write a children’s book about the simple machines around us with color illustrations that could be shared with the lower elementary classrooms, research the simple machines in the human body and build a model showing at least three of these.
ELEMENTARY II COMMUNITY
Fourth Great Lesson
Students participated in the Montessori 
“ Fourth Great Lesson” often referred to as Communication in Signs. This lesson is the historical story telling of how humans developed written expression. This lesson draws on the incredible ability that humans have of expressing their thoughts in writing. Included in the story are pictographs, symbols, hieroglyphs, early alphabets, and the invention of the printing press.
This lesson leads then leads to the study of:
  • Reading: literature, poetry, non-fiction, myths and folk tales, authors, reading comprehension, reading analysis, literary terms.
  • Writing: elements of style, function, voice, composition, letter writing, research, study skills.
  • Language: origins of spoken language, foreign languages, history of languages, speech, drama
  • Structure: alphabets, bookmaking, grammar, punctuation, sentence analysis, word study, figures of speech.
ELEMENTARY I COMMUNITY
Third year students integrate 21st century
technology into their weekly lessons.
SEL lessons continued with the lesson on “self talk.” Self-talk is a skill for learning that helps students stay focused, and on task. This skill also helps students manage their emotions so they can make better decisions in stressful situations. The lesson is taught with stories and games such as the “Let’s Play Who’s Talking” game designed to help students practice focusing attention and listening. 
Students continue to use the illustrative Montessori materials to learn and practice abstract concepts.
Elementary Montessori Materials-Concrete to Abstract
Montessori materials illustrate concepts and lead to an understanding of abstract concepts. Our classrooms are filled with many such materials. For example, all students enjoy working with the grammar symbols, which helps students understand the building blocks of our language. We analyze and build sentences with these colorful materials.
PRIMARY COMMUNITY
Elder Way primary students learned about the Mars Rovers, how they were constructed, traveled to Mars, and their purpose. Many students made their own rovers out of cardboard, tape and pipe cleaners. We spent some time looking at photos from Perseverance and listening to audio from Mars as well.
Your Extracurricular
Dollars at Work
The “Three Sisters’ ‘ garden continues to grow and thrive. The glass-gem corn has been harvested, and the tepary beans are just beginning to produce! Our very first squash blossoms are in bloom.
“How to Make a Sincere Apology”
A Lesson in Social Emotional Learning
HERMOSA STUDENT
ATHLETE PROGRAM
FOOTBALL
BASKETBALL
CHEERLEADING
HERMOSA MONTESSORI PUBLIC CHARTER SCHOOL (K-8)
HERMOSA MONTESSORI PRESCHOOL
520.749.5518
Questions about Headlines?
Contact HRT@hermosaschool.org
www.hermosaschool.org

Be sure to click “…” to expand the entire email
When Dr. Montessori created her educational philosophy and materials, the world had not yet been infused with the technology and devices that are now common in the 21st century. As a public charter school, Hermosa integrates Arizona Academic Standards within the context of Montessori philosophy. The Arizona Academic Technology Standards are designed to … “illustrate what students should know and be able to do in a digital world.” The Technology Standards include the following Sample Student Performance guidelines, “ Students use automated learning systems to demonstrate learning and receive active feedback (e.g., online quizzes, interactive content learning platforms). •Students create, review, and share work using digital tools. •Students, with guidance, create artifacts using digital tools to demonstrate their learning, such as posters, presentations, video, or audio recordings. 
Students curate resources (e.g., locate, collect, select) from multiple sources for an intended purpose. • Students use digital tools to organize online resources, information, and media into useful collections or artifacts (e.g., graphic organizers, timelines, infographics). •Students select and organize digital resources, then use a variety of digital tools (e.g., resource management, annotation and notetaking, citation-creation) to showcase learning through an assemblage of content and/or artifacts (e.g., portfolio, website, multimedia). “
While we work to integrate technology wisely into our curriculum, we are aware of the possibility of misuse and even addiction. The following article from Dr. Charles Fay provides excellent examples of how to tame the technology monster.
“Although the basics of parenting remain the same, issues involving technology often baffle many parents and cause them to wonder what limits are appropriate, how to hold their children accountable for misuse of technology, and how to help kids learn the decision-making skills required to make healthy technology choices when they leave home.
Do you ever feel like your child’s cell phone, game console, or computer is like a monster that has taken over your home? Here are some signs that technology use might be a problem for your kids:
Do your kids become defiant and refuse to take a break from their phone or computer?
Even if they are willing to take a break, do they become exceptionally irritable, depressed, or bored during that time?
Do they lie to you about their technology use and sneak time during their break?
Any of these classic withdrawal symptoms are possible signs that your loved one has a problem that can lead to serious consequences if left untreated.
Technology can be a wonderful tool for communication, learning, and healthy enjoyment. However it can also become a dark and destructive influence in the absence of necessary parental supervision and limits. Below are a few examples of enforceable limits that we, as parents, can provide:
  • You may have your computer in the living room, not in your room.
  • You may be on the internet if I’m allowed to review your internet history.
  • You may be on social media if I can have access to your pages.
  • Feel free to have a cell phone if you can pay for the service.
  • You may keep your cell phone if you are not using it during meals, in class, or while driving.
  • I allow kids to use technology in my home if I feel that they are being respectful and responsible.
  • I immediately donate to charity any devices used to view or send pornography.
Although we can’t control what our kids do when they are away from home, we can set good, solid limits while they’re under our roofs. If they complain, “You don’t trust me!” you can reply, “I don’t even trust myself. Lots of good people get in trouble with technology. That’s why I always make sure that your mom/dad knows what I’m doing on my computer, too.”
-Charles Fay Ph.D.
COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS
Stay tuned for all carnival information, including:
-Purchasing Entry Wristband
-More Raffle Basket Donation Opportunities
-Volunteer Sign Up
-Volunteer Schedule (for those volunteering on the event day)
-Commemorative Carnival T-Shirt Print Orders (designed by Hermosa student)
-All Carnival Attractions:
-Rides
-Games
-Food Trucks
-Entertainment
-and MORE!
In Language Arts, students started reading their first novels, and learned how to complete a reading response. Small groups meet in “book club” groups to discuss their novels. 
In Natural World (Science), students pondered these quotes:
“Gravity cannot be held responsible for people falling in love.” 
– Albert Einstein 
“It also can’t be blamed for people falling…
when they’re just clumsy.”
– Sammi
and the following guiding question,
How do machines change the way work is done?”
Students learned the scientific definition of work defined as a force applied over a distance (work=force x distance). They also learned that machines affect work done on an object by either changing the force that is applied or the distance the object moves and that simple machines humans created were devised to make work easier. Students learned the historical perspective on machines that helped create the pyramids, Stonehenge, and other ancient wonders. The six simple machines are the inclined plane, the wedge, the screw, the lever, the wheel and axle, and the pulley. Students put their learning on display in their lab activities in which they participated in the simple machines experiments. They also built various simple machines to learn about:
 
  • Effort Force
  • Efficiency
  • Resistant Force
  • Mechanical Advantage
  • Resistance Force
Students worked on their personal projects to either design and build their own functioning simple machine, write a children’s book about the simple machines around us with color illustrations that could be shared with the lower elementary classrooms, research the simple machines in the human body and build a model showing at least three of these.
ELEMENTARY II COMMUNITY
Fourth Great Lesson
Students participated in the Montessori 
“ Fourth Great Lesson” often referred to as Communication in Signs. This lesson is the historical story telling of how humans developed written expression. This lesson draws on the incredible ability that humans have of expressing their thoughts in writing. Included in the story are pictographs, symbols, hieroglyphs, early alphabets, and the invention of the printing press.
This lesson leads then leads to the study of:
  • Reading: literature, poetry, non-fiction, myths and folk tales, authors, reading comprehension, reading analysis, literary terms.
  • Writing: elements of style, function, voice, composition, letter writing, research, study skills.
  • Language: origins of spoken language, foreign languages, history of languages, speech, drama
  • Structure: alphabets, bookmaking, grammar, punctuation, sentence analysis, word study, figures of speech.
ELEMENTARY I COMMUNITY
Third year students integrate 21st century
technology into their weekly lessons.
SEL lessons continued with the lesson on “self talk.” Self-talk is a skill for learning that helps students stay focused, and on task. This skill also helps students manage their emotions so they can make better decisions in stressful situations. The lesson is taught with stories and games such as the “Let’s Play Who’s Talking” game designed to help students practice focusing attention and listening. 
Students continue to use the illustrative Montessori materials to learn and practice abstract concepts.
Elementary Montessori Materials-Concrete to Abstract
Montessori materials illustrate concepts and lead to an understanding of abstract concepts. Our classrooms are filled with many such materials. For example, all students enjoy working with the grammar symbols, which helps students understand the building blocks of our language. We analyze and build sentences with these colorful materials.
PRIMARY COMMUNITY
Elder Way primary students learned about the Mars Rovers, how they were constructed, traveled to Mars, and their purpose. Many students made their own rovers out of cardboard, tape and pipe cleaners. We spent some time looking at photos from Perseverance and listening to audio from Mars as well.
Your Extracurricular
Dollars at Work
The “Three Sisters’ ‘ garden continues to grow and thrive. The glass-gem corn has been harvested, and the tepary beans are just beginning to produce! Our very first squash blossoms are in bloom.
“How to Make a Sincere Apology”
A Lesson in Social Emotional Learning
HERMOSA STUDENT
ATHLETE PROGRAM
FOOTBALL
BASKETBALL
CHEERLEADING
HERMOSA MONTESSORI PUBLIC CHARTER SCHOOL (K-8)
HERMOSA MONTESSORI PRESCHOOL
520.749.5518
Questions about Headlines?
Contact HRT@hermosaschool.org
www.hermosaschool.org

Be sure to click “…” to expand the entire email
When Dr. Montessori created her educational philosophy and materials, the world had not yet been infused with the technology and devices that are now common in the 21st century. As a public charter school, Hermosa integrates Arizona Academic Standards within the context of Montessori philosophy. The Arizona Academic Technology Standards are designed to … “illustrate what students should know and be able to do in a digital world.” The Technology Standards include the following Sample Student Performance guidelines, “ Students use automated learning systems to demonstrate learning and receive active feedback (e.g., online quizzes, interactive content learning platforms). •Students create, review, and share work using digital tools. •Students, with guidance, create artifacts using digital tools to demonstrate their learning, such as posters, presentations, video, or audio recordings. 
Students curate resources (e.g., locate, collect, select) from multiple sources for an intended purpose. • Students use digital tools to organize online resources, information, and media into useful collections or artifacts (e.g., graphic organizers, timelines, infographics). •Students select and organize digital resources, then use a variety of digital tools (e.g., resource management, annotation and notetaking, citation-creation) to showcase learning through an assemblage of content and/or artifacts (e.g., portfolio, website, multimedia). “
While we work to integrate technology wisely into our curriculum, we are aware of the possibility of misuse and even addiction. The following article from Dr. Charles Fay provides excellent examples of how to tame the technology monster.
“Although the basics of parenting remain the same, issues involving technology often baffle many parents and cause them to wonder what limits are appropriate, how to hold their children accountable for misuse of technology, and how to help kids learn the decision-making skills required to make healthy technology choices when they leave home.
Do you ever feel like your child’s cell phone, game console, or computer is like a monster that has taken over your home? Here are some signs that technology use might be a problem for your kids:
Do your kids become defiant and refuse to take a break from their phone or computer?
Even if they are willing to take a break, do they become exceptionally irritable, depressed, or bored during that time?
Do they lie to you about their technology use and sneak time during their break?
Any of these classic withdrawal symptoms are possible signs that your loved one has a problem that can lead to serious consequences if left untreated.
Technology can be a wonderful tool for communication, learning, and healthy enjoyment. However it can also become a dark and destructive influence in the absence of necessary parental supervision and limits. Below are a few examples of enforceable limits that we, as parents, can provide:
  • You may have your computer in the living room, not in your room.
  • You may be on the internet if I’m allowed to review your internet history.
  • You may be on social media if I can have access to your pages.
  • Feel free to have a cell phone if you can pay for the service.
  • You may keep your cell phone if you are not using it during meals, in class, or while driving.
  • I allow kids to use technology in my home if I feel that they are being respectful and responsible.
  • I immediately donate to charity any devices used to view or send pornography.
Although we can’t control what our kids do when they are away from home, we can set good, solid limits while they’re under our roofs. If they complain, “You don’t trust me!” you can reply, “I don’t even trust myself. Lots of good people get in trouble with technology. That’s why I always make sure that your mom/dad knows what I’m doing on my computer, too.”
-Charles Fay Ph.D.
COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS
Stay tuned for all carnival information, including:
-Purchasing Entry Wristband
-More Raffle Basket Donation Opportunities
-Volunteer Sign Up
-Volunteer Schedule (for those volunteering on the event day)
-Commemorative Carnival T-Shirt Print Orders (designed by Hermosa student)
-All Carnival Attractions:
-Rides
-Games
-Food Trucks
-Entertainment
-and MORE!
In Language Arts, students started reading their first novels, and learned how to complete a reading response. Small groups meet in “book club” groups to discuss their novels. 
In Natural World (Science), students pondered these quotes:
“Gravity cannot be held responsible for people falling in love.” 
– Albert Einstein 
“It also can’t be blamed for people falling…
when they’re just clumsy.”
– Sammi
and the following guiding question,
How do machines change the way work is done?”
Students learned the scientific definition of work defined as a force applied over a distance (work=force x distance). They also learned that machines affect work done on an object by either changing the force that is applied or the distance the object moves and that simple machines humans created were devised to make work easier. Students learned the historical perspective on machines that helped create the pyramids, Stonehenge, and other ancient wonders. The six simple machines are the inclined plane, the wedge, the screw, the lever, the wheel and axle, and the pulley. Students put their learning on display in their lab activities in which they participated in the simple machines experiments. They also built various simple machines to learn about:
 
  • Effort Force
  • Efficiency
  • Resistant Force
  • Mechanical Advantage
  • Resistance Force
Students worked on their personal projects to either design and build their own functioning simple machine, write a children’s book about the simple machines around us with color illustrations that could be shared with the lower elementary classrooms, research the simple machines in the human body and build a model showing at least three of these.
ELEMENTARY II COMMUNITY
Fourth Great Lesson